This Day in Track & Field–June 13

1925–Michigan’s DeHart Hubbard, the 1924 Olympic Champion in the Long Jump, won his specialty at the 4th NCAA Championships in Chicago with a World Record leap of 25-10  7/8 (7.89m). Hubbard, who was inducted into the U.S. T&F Hall of Fame in 1979, also won the 100-yard dash in 9.8.

He also won the NCAA Long Jump in 1923 but had to wait two years to defend his title. The meet in 1924 was canceled due to a conflict with the U.S. Olympic Trials.

Resultshttps://trackandfieldnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/1925.pdf

Hall of Fame Bio(1979)http://oldserver.usatf.org/HallOfFame/TF/showBio.asp?HOFIDs=77

http://www.ustfccca.org/ncaa-100/dehart-hubbard-michigan-world-record-long-jump-ncaa-championships

1936–Don Lash ran 8:58.3 (ratified as 8:58.4) at the Princeton Invitation to break Paavo Nurmi’s World Record for 2-miles (8:59.6).

Hall of Fame Bio(1995)http://oldserver.usatf.org/HallOfFame/TF/showBio.asp?HOFIDs=93

1942—Georgetown senior Al Blozis won his 3rd straight title in the Shot Put at the NCAA Championships in Lincoln,Nebraska. Blozis won every title open to him from 1940-1942, winning 3 IC4A Indoor and Outdoor titles, 3 U.S. Indoor titles, and would win his 3rd U.S. Outdoor title later in 1942. He was inducted into the National Hall of Fame in 2015 and was an All-Pro tackle with the NY Giants. Only 26 at the time, he was killed in action in 1945 during World War II.

Cal junior Hal Davis, the co-World Record holder at 100-meters, was the winner of the 100y (9.6) and 220y (21.2-straight). He would win the double again in 1943 and was inducted into the National HOF in 1974(charter member).

USC easily won its 8th straight team title (they would extend their streak to 9 in 1943).

Results:https://trackandfieldnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/1942.pdf

http://oldserver.usatf.org/Athlete-Bios/Hall-of-Fame/2015-Hall-of-Fame-Bios/Al-Blozis.aspx

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Al_Blozis

HOF Bio(Davis)http://oldserver.usatf.org/HallOfFame/TF/showBio.asp?HOFIDs=41

NY Times(for subscribers)https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1942/06/14/119451119.pdf?pdf_redirect=true&ip=0

 

1959—With San Jose State senior Ray Norton, the co-holder of the World Record (9.3) in the event, false-starting out of the final, Kansas junior Charlie Tidwell won the 100y with a wind-aided 9.3 at the NCAA Championships in Lincoln, Nebraska. 3rd was Tennessee State sophomore John Moon (9.5y), who has been coaching at Seton Hall since 1972! Norton did come away with a win in the 220y (20.9).

Texas senior Eddie Southern, the silver medalist in the 400-Meter Hurdles at the 1956 Olympics, won the 440y (without hurdles!) in 46.4.

Others who would win Olympic medals the following year in Rome:

Eastern Michigan junior Hayes Jones (bronze) won the 120y-Hurdles (13.6) over Indiana senior Willie May (13.9/silver) 13.9. Jones also won the 220y-hurdles (22.5/turn) over Tidwell (22.6) and went on to win Olympic gold in the 110-Meter Hurdles in 1964.

New Mexico sophomore Dick Howard (50.6-MR/bronze), won the 440y-Hurdles over Kansas junior Cliff Cushman (51.3/silver).

Missouri junior Dick Cochran won the Discus with a throw of 178-0 (54.25?)  and won the bronze medal in Rome.

After finishing 2nd to Villanova’s Ron Delany (now graduated) the previous 2 years, Oregon senior Jim Grelle finally won the NCAA Mile (4:03.9).

Kansas won the team title.

Resultshttps://trackandfieldnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/1959.pdf

NY Times:  https://timesmachine.nytimes.com/timesmachine/1959/06/14/89126308.pdf?pdf_redirect=true&ip=0

 

1964–Fred Hansen cleared 17-1  ¾ (5.23) in San Diego to take away the World Record in the pole vault from John Pennel, who jumped 17-3/4 (5.20m) in 1963.

WR Progression: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Men’s_pole_vault_world_record_progression

Basil Heatley, Olympic silver medalist, photo by Englandathletics.org

1964Basil Heatley ran 2:13:55 in Chiswick, England, to break Buddy Edelen’s World Record of 2:14:28, which was set on the same course in 1963. Heatley went on to win the silver medal at the Tokyo Olympics later in the year.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basil_Heatley

 

1974–Poland’s Irena Szewinska set a World Record of 22.21 for 200 meters in Potsdam, Germany,

WR Progression:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Women’s_200_metres_world_record_progression

https://www.worldathletics.org/news/news/szewinskas-iaaf-hall-of-fame-induction-announ

Irena Szweinska was one of the finest sprinters of all times, photo courtesy of PZLA.PL

 

1991—With Bruce Jenner and Daley Thompson, the former and current World Record holders in the event looking on (and offering advice), Dan O’Brien won the Decathlon at the U.S. Championships at NY’s Randall’s Island, scoring 8844 points, well beyond Jenner’s American Record of 8618 and just 3 points shy of Thompson’s WR of 8.847!.

There was no wind gauge present for the 1st two events (100, Long Jump), which meant that no records could be set, which would have been embarrassing for meet officials if the wind reading (4.2) in the 2nd-day’s 110-Hurdles hadn’t been above the allowable limit for a Decathlon record!

T&F News Coverhttps://trackandfieldnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/1991_08.jpg

NY Times Coverage

 

1992–The incomparable Sergey Bubka set another World Record in the Pole Vault, clearing 20-1/2 (6.11m) in Dijon, France. WR Progression: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Men’s_pole_vault_world_record_progression

1998–Running his last 4 laps in under 4-minutes, Haile Gebrselassie ran 12:39.36 for 5000-Meters in Helsinki to regain the World Record from Kenya’s Daniel Komen, who set the previous mark of 12:39.74 in 1997.

WR Progression: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/5000_metres

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vnyx06yjhU4

 

2009—In addition to the individual winners, the NCAA Championships saw a few other firsts. They were held for the first time in Fayetteville, Arkansas, at John McDonnell Field, named for the Razorbacks’ Hall-of-Fame coach.

And Pat Henry, who had won 27 NCAA team titles while at LSU, won his first as the head coach at Texas A&M. And not just one title, with the Aggies sweeping the men’s and women’s crowns, the first in the school’s history.

Both team battles went down to the wire, with the A&M men clinching with a 2nd-place finish in the concluding 4×400 (3:00.91). 4 teams had been in contention for the team title heading into the relay, with the final scores showing how close the battle was: Texas A&M winning with 48 points, and a 3-way tie for 2nd with 46 points-Florida, Florida State, Oregon.

The A&M women scored lots of points on the final day to overtake Oregon (50-43), the final points coming from Yasmine Regis (45-4  1/4w), who finished 2nd in the Triple Jump.

Junior Porscha Lucas gave the Aggies their only individual win of the meet, finishing 1st in the 200 (22.81) on Saturday. On Friday, she had finished 4th in the 100 (11.31) and run the 2nd leg on the team that set a Collegiate Record of 42.36. The previous Record of 42.50 had been set in 1989 by a Pat Henry-coached LSU team.

Other Highlights

Women

Colorado senior Jenny Barringer-Simpson won her 3rd title in the Steeplechase (6-12) and broke her own Collegiate Record (9:26.20) with her winning time of 9:25.54. She had previously won in 2006 and 2008. Just a week earlier, she set the current Collegiate Record of 3:59.90 for 1500-Meters at the Prefontaine Classic in Eugene. She would become the 1st female recipient of The Bowerman award at the end of the year.

Another 3-time winner  was Texas Junior Destinee Hooker (6-4  ¾[1.95]) in the High Jump (also won in 2006 & 2007).

Oregon sophomore Brianne Theisen won the 1st of her 3 title in the Heptathlon with a score of 6,086 points. She would win again in 2010 & 2012.

Florida State’s Kimberley Williams, a sophomore from Jamaica, won the Long (21-5  ½[6.54]) and Triple (47-2  ¼]). Jumps. She had earlier won the 1st of her three NCAA Indoor titles in the Triple Jump in March.

Men

Senior Galen Rupp finished off his dream senior year at Oregon by winning the 5000 (14:04.12) and 10,000 (28:21.45). He had also won NCAA titles in X-Country in November, and the 3000 and 5000 Indoors.

The winner of that team title-deciding 4×400 was Florida State, which was led by Kevin (2nd) and Jonathan (anchor) Borlée, freshmen from Belgium. Both split 43.8 and Jonathan had earlier won the 400 (44.78)

Oklahoma State freshman German Fernandez, leading from the gun, won the 1500—meters in 3:39.00. Coupled with his indoor Collegiate Record of 3:55.02 in the mile, the T&F News cover for the NCAA meet read, “The Next Great U.S. Miler?”, but later injuries kept him from fulfilling his great promise. A foot injury limited Oregon freshman Matthew Centrowitz to a non-advancing 9th-place finish in his heat.

Oklahoma freshman Will Claye celebrated his 18th birthday by winning the Triple Jump with a wind-aided leap of       56-6  ¾ (17.24). His legal best of 56-4  ¾ (17.10) bettered his own American Junior Record of 55-7 (16.94). Finishing 3rd was another freshman, Florida’s Christian Taylor (55-5  3/4w). The two became teammates at Florida when Claye transferred from Oklahoma after his sophomore year and they helped establish Florida as “Jumps U”. And they are still engaged in one of the sport’s great rivalries.

Oregon junior Ashton Eaton won the 2nd of his three consecutive titles in the Decathlon with a score of 8.241 points.

Another Duck junior, Andrew Wheating (1:46.21), edged a diving Tevan Everett (1:46.27) to win the 1st of his two titles in the 800. He had finished 2nd in a similar photo finish the previous year to another Texas Longhorn, Jacob Hernandez (1:45.31-1:45.32).

Florida State’s Ngoni Makusha (26-7  1/4w[8.11]) won the Long Jump for the 2nd year in a row. The sophomore from Zimbabwe would win a 3rd title in 2011. He had failed to qualify for the Championships at the East Regional, but was a late add to the field after a spot opened up.

There were lightning/thunderstorm delays on the 1st and 3rd days of the meet.

LetsRun Coverage: https://www.letsrun.com/2009/day40613.php

Results

https://www.flashresults.com/2009_Meets/outdoor/NCAA/index.htm

Finalists

Menhttps://trackandfieldnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/05/2009.pdf

Womenhttps://trackandfieldnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/2009w.pdf

Texas A&Mhttps://big12sports.com/news/2009/6/13/3749956.aspx

T&F News Cover(Fernandez)https://trackandfieldnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/11/2009-08.jpg

http://www.ustfccca.org/ncaa-100/jenny-barringer-colorado-2009-ncaa-championships-steeplechase-the-bowerman

 

2014—Baylor freshman Trayvon Bromell won the Men’s 100-Meters in 9.97 at the NCAA Championships (June 11-14) in Eugene, Oregon, breaking the World Junior Record of 10.01 that he shared with Trinidad & Tobago’s Darrell Brown.

Full recap tomorrow (June 14).

 

2015—The men had their turn the day before, now it was time for the women to shine at the NCAA Championships.

Running in front of the hometown crowd in Eugene, freshman Raevyn Rogers (1:59.71) won the 800 to help Oregon win the team title over Kentucky, 59-50. The Ducks had won the men’s title the day before (6-12) by almost 30 points over Florida (85-56). Rogers would win a total of 5 NCAA titles in the 800 (3-outdoor, 2-indoor).

Junior Jenna Prandini was the big scorer for the Ducks, winning the 100 (10.96w) and placing 2nd in the 200 (22.21w) and the Long Jump (22-3  3/4w/6.80).

Kentucky senior Keni Harrison won the 100-meter hurdles (12.55) and finished 2nd (54.09) to Texas A&M’s Shamier Little (53.74) in the 400-hurdles. Harrison set a World Record of 12.20 in the shorter race in 2016. 3rd in the short hurdles was USC frosh Dior Hall, who set a World Junior Record of 12.74 (Still the AJR).

Stephen F. Austin junior Demi Payne (15-5[4.70]) won the Pole Vault (6-11) over Arkansas’ Sandi Morris (15-3 [4.65]). Payne’s career was interrupted when she suffered a serious injury to her hand at the 2016 Texas Relays, while Morris has become one of the best vaulters in the world, winning gold at the 2018 World Indoor Championships and silvers at the 2016 Olympics, 2016 Indoor Worlds, and 2017 and 2019 Outdoor Worlds.

Georgia freshman Keturah Orji won the first of her 4 outdoor titles in the Triple Jump (she would also win 3 Indoor titles). Her winning mark of (46-5  ¼[14.15]) is still the American Junior Record.

Another freshman, Southern Illinois’ Raven Saunders, the 2015 Indoor Champion, won the Shot Put with a toss of 60-2  ½ (18.35), while teammate DeAnna Price won the first of her two titles in the Hammer Throw (6-11) with a Meet Record throw of 234-6 (71.49). Saunders, after transferring to Ole Miss, won outdoors again in 2016 and Indoors in 2017, and  went on to win the silver medal at the 2021 Olympics in Tokyo.

Price, the current American Record holder, won the gold medal at the 2019 World Championships (1st American to win a global title in the hammer).

Finalists

Womenhttps://trackandfieldnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/2015w.pdf

Complete Resultshttp://flashresults.com/2015_Meets/Outdoor/06-10_NCAA/

Oregon Sweephttp://goducks.com/news/2015/6/14/210149391.aspx?path=track

 

NCAA History

Past Champions(Through 2019)

Menhttp://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/track_outdoor_champs_records/2019/D1Men.pdf

Womenhttp://fs.ncaa.org/Docs/stats/track_outdoor_champs_records/2019/D1Women.pdf

USTFCCCAhttp://www.ustfccca.org/meets-results/meet-history?series=3369

T&F News

https://trackandfieldnews.com/historical-results/a-history-of-the-ncaa-championships-1921-2018/

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